For the past two years, ride hailing giant Didi Chuxing has laid low, waiting out a storm of public outrage that followed incidents when two female passengers who used the platform were killed by their drivers.

Now, the days of biding its time are over. The company has launched a slew of new brands and continued its push abroad, going up against Uber in more markets (and entering Russia).

Didi also recently restructured, creating a maze of sub-brands that cover diverse consumer groups in higher- and lower- tier cities across China, most notably launching a low-cost ride hailing service and rebranding its taxi-hailing app.

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Jill Shen

Jill Shen is Shanghai-based technology reporter. She covers Chinese mobility, autonomous vehicles, and electric cars. Connect with her via e-mail: jill.shen@technode.com or Twitter: @yushan_shen