(I talked with a friend of mine, a journalist-turned-editor at one of the major business newspapers in China, which gave me a better understanding of changes in Chinese media industry.)

China Internet Week, a magazine established in 1998 – the year when Sina and Sohu launched online portal sites, became a hot advertising platform shortly after its launch. Jiang Qiping, its founding chief editor, remembered the old good days around 1999 when advertisers, most being emerging e-commerce players, were waiting in line to throw money at them. The advertising revenue his company received in that year made a record, Jiang recalled in 2010. But now, it’s just another print magazine very small a number of readers would buy.

To my knowledge, Chinese print media have been making a majority of revenues from advertising, which isn’t so simple as ad pages in publications, but in various forms; for instance, research reports at request of brands, advertising offerings at conferences held by a magazine, etc. Media people generally refer to their major revenue source as “organizing conferences”. Advertising revenues from conferences are in forms of sponsorship slots, speaking slots, articles or ads in conference journals.

Start your free trial now.

Get instant access to all our premium content, archives, newsletters, and online community.

Monthly Membership

Yearly Membership

What you get

Full access to all premium content and our full archives

Members'-only newsletters

Preferential access and discounts to all TechNode events

Direct access to the TechNode newsroom

Start your free trial now.

Get instant access to all our premium content, archives, newsletters, and online community.

Monthly Membership

Yearly Membership

Tracey Xiang

Tracey Xiang is Beijing, China-based tech writer. Reach her at traceyxiang@gmail.com