World Wide Web Consortium, the organization behind efforts like web standards and guidelines to ensure a long-term growth for the Web just announced to set up Beihang University as a new center for W3C technical staff in China in an aim to ramp up collaboration among Chinese companies, developers, research institutes and W3C’s communities from other 40 countries through a more substantial China presence.

Chinese online activities contributed a lot to what makes the world’s second largest economy. For example, the Web Index 2012 indicates that “online shopping represents the largest growth segment of Internet use in China” while an April 2012 report found that “[Around 2015] China will likely become the largest online retail market in the world, with close to 10 percent of retail sales occurring online”. Web is playing a more important role in the Middle Kingdom’s economic life.

Beihang, the Beijing-based technical university, which also goes by Beijing University of Aeronautics & Astronautics, has been helping promote and shape web standards in China since six years ago via a partnership with W3C. Ian Jacobs, head of communication of W3C told us that “Beihang has been a big supporter of W3C’s, and because of their successes (organizing events, working with companies in China to join W3C) and because of the activity in the internet space in China, we decided it was a good time to set up a more substantial presence”. Also, there has been an increase in Chinese participation in standards bodies.

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Ben Jiang

Listener of startups, writer on tech. Maker of things, dreamer by choice.