Tencent, the Chinese Internet giant, announced open strategy for mobile apps today. Not only will it open up its mobile app distribution channels and infrastructure, its offerings also, to attract star performers, range from working spaces to IPO consulting.

Before 2011 the Tencent way was licensing a portion of games from third parties and developing Internet services in house. More than half of its revenues were from licensed games and in-house developed games. Another major revenue source was membership subscriptions that offer a variety of virtual items or premium services that were either developed by Tencent or partners — it pays partners and third-party developers, of course.

The company decided to open up in mid-2011, inviting third-party Internet services to take advantage of its huge user base across its online properties, QQ IM, social network Q-zone, etc. Social shopping services Meilishuo and Mogujie were successful cases that targeted ads on Q-zone helped them engage audience whom they otherwise could hardly reach. Of course Tencent wouldn’t help anyone promote services that it has already had and is important to the company, such as instant messaging tool. Other services, such as QQ Connect, a login and sharing widget, and Cloud storage, were also available for developers to use.

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Tracey Xiang

Tracey Xiang is Beijing, China-based tech writer. Reach her at traceyxiang@gmail.com