If you came to Beijing for the Summer Olympics in 2008, you would be hard pressed to find an affordable variety of palatable non-Chinese food. However, as China’s economy develops, as more of its citizens go abroad, as their desire for something different multiplies, there is a surprisingly huge gap between what they want and what is available.

“The demographic of consumers has changed a lot in the last 10 years. We’re seeing a more educated class of consumers in China,” says Stewart Johnson, co-founder of Hatchery, a food and beverage incubator based in Beijing. “They’ve spent time abroad and are used to more innovation in their city, whether its events, the arts, there’s a broader demand.”

However, that doesn’t mean that you can just open a business and be an overnight success. In fact, it’s quite the opposite. History is littered with the failures of a China entry strategy: Home Depot, Best Buy, Groupon, eBay, Tesco, and Marks & Spencer. 1

Start your free trial now.

Get instant access to all our premium content, archives, newsletters, and online community.

Monthly Membership

Yearly Membership

What you get

Full access to all premium content and our full archives

Members'-only newsletters

Preferential access and discounts to all TechNode events

Direct access to the TechNode newsroom

Start your free trial now.

Get instant access to all our premium content, archives, newsletters, and online community.

Monthly Membership

Yearly Membership

John Artman

John Artman is the Editor in Chief for TechNode, the leading English information source for news and insight into China’s tech and startups, and co-host of the China Tech Talk podcast, a regular discussion...