After years of lack of interest about data privacy in China—some of it due to low awareness and some of it due to low chances of making a difference—the issue has come under the public eye. Caused in part by the implementation of China’s new cybersecurity, privacy scandals from China’s tech giants —active in almost every part of life in China—have ignited a much bigger reaction.

In the West, many already view computers and smartphones with suspicion. It was in 2011 that Europe received its first search engine that enables privacy—Qwant—several years after DuckDuckGo made its appearance in the US. The company recently came to China as a part of the delegation of about 50 businessmen brought by French president Emmanuel Macron during his first state visit.

Eric Léandri, Qwant’s co-founder and president, thinks that China has an interesting way of ensuring privacy. Among other things, its cybersecurity law requires that data from Chinese citizens remain in China.

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Masha Borak

Masha Borak is a technology reporter based in Beijing. Write to her at masha.borak [at] technode.com. Pitches with the word "disruptive" will be ignored. Read a good book - learn some more adjectives.