In March last year, South Korea allowed the US to install the Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) missile system on its soil. Since then, China has launched a series of retaliatory moves against the neighboring country. The unofficial boycott has affected a group of booming industries that range from pan-entertainment to tourism.

As a part of the move, Beijing has refused to issue new licenses for games made in South Korea. This practically prevents any new South Korean titles from entering the country, because since 2016 all games must receive the governmental approval before they can be distributed in China.

As of April this year, not a single of China’s 412 authorized foreign online games were developed by a South Korean gaming company. Meanwhile, the Korean government licensed 111 Chinese online games, granting Chinese game developers a combined KW 200 billion (around RMB 1.18 billion) of revenue, up KW 80 billion (RMB 475 million) YoY.

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Emma Lee

Emma Lee is Shanghai-based tech writer, covering startups and tech happenings in China and Asia in general. We are looking for stories related to tech and China. Reach her at lixin@technode.com.