Digital technologies have shaped the modern world. They have become great equalizers capable of amplifying voices that previously went unheard. Unfortunately, in China and the rest of the world, they have so far been unable to tackle the gender inequality within the technology industry.

Less than a third of female students in China undertake technology-related degrees. Despite this low number, 90% of Chinese women involved in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) industries feel driven by a sense of meaning and purpose. Nonetheless, 30% of them are likely to leave their jobs within the first year.

The reasons are numerous. From lack of upward mobility within corporate structures to coworkers believing the false notion that men have a genetic advantage in technical fields as well as bias in performance evaluations. Women even report that behaving like men is beneficial to advancing their careers.

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Chris Udemans

Christopher Udemans is a Shanghai-based data and graphics reporter. He covers Chinese artificial intelligence, mobility, and cybersecurity. You can contact him at chrisudemans [at] technode [dot] com.