China has never been a hotbed for operating system (OS) development. Nearly half of the country’s OS market share is controlled by Google’s Android, with another quarter belonging to Microsoft’s Windows.

That isn’t to say that it has not been a part of the process of creating an operating system. In 2001, researchers at the country’s National University of Defense Technology began developing an OS specifically designed for use by China’s military and other government departments.

Dubbed Kylin, the OS was first based on FreeBSD and later on Linux. In 2015, NeoKylin was launched, with the hope that it would replace Windows on the country’s computers.  Other locally developed OSs include China Operating System, which was intended for use on mobile devices and set-top boxes.

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Chris Udemans

Christopher Udemans is a Shanghai-based data and graphics reporter. He covers Chinese artificial intelligence, mobility, and cybersecurity. You can contact him at chrisudemans [at] technode [dot] com.