The peak of China’s #MeToo movement seems to have past. Once heated discussions have died down and busy netizens have shifted their focus to the next topic.

On China’s most used search engine Baidu, searches for the word “MeToo” have dropped to one-tenth of its highest point in mid-July, according to Baidu statistics. On Weibo, China’s Twitter-like platform and also where the movement originated, the word “MeToo” was excluded from statistics as the phrase was taken down from the social network. Its counterpart in Chinese “Rice Rabit” (米兔, pronounced as mee-too in Mandarin), coined to circumvent online content control, showed the similar trend.

“The number of the general public who are concerned with the subject is decreasing, but the discussion is still going on among the core members,” Teresa Xu, volunteer at an NGO battling sexual harassment, told TechNode. By core members, she meant people within the NGO communities who have been following the issue before #MeToo started.

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Jiefei Liu

Jiefei Liu is a Beijing based tech reporter. She focuses on the union of tech and content creation and loves agriculture. You can write to her at Jiefei@technode.com