In late 2014, Dianping cut off ties with an employee in Nanjing for allegedly sharing a picture of her pay slip on an anonymous online platform. The worker, whose last name is Ji, fired back soon after by sueing the company for a salary and compensation package of over RMB 160,000.

The debacle led to two court cases, with judges finally deciding that Dianping had terminated the work agreement without sufficient evidence and that Ji was owed a large part of the sum she demanded. It also set off some debate about whether workers are allowed to share details of their salary, and if companies should penalize them for doing so.

Ji first joined Dianping’s Nanjing branch in 2011 in the popular food-delivery app’s sales department. According to local media, the company’s job offer statement emphasizes that salary is highly private information and should not be shared among coworkers. Dianping’s company employee handbook also states that revealing employee information without permission is a serious violation, and one’s contract can be broken off as a result. Ji was required to sign a confidentiality agreement stating that the company could fire her without compensation if she violated their terms.

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Bailey Hu

Bailey Hu is based in China’s hardware capital, Shenzhen. Her interests include local maker culture, grassroots innovation and how tech shapes society, as well as vice versa.