Image credit: Bailey Hu/TechNode

Thousands of visitors swarmed the broad array of tech-centered booths, interactive exhibits, and crafting workshops at Shenzhen’s most recent Maker Faire, held in early October. Among the crowds, which organizers estimate at around 50,000 people, a significant number of elementary school students were lured in by the promise of gadgets and new toys.

But if China’s government, forward-thinking educators, and perhaps most of all, parents have their way, children will be more than just admiring observers of new technology—they’ll be on the front lines of China’s still-growing maker movement. That, in turn, is part of a bigger push to rethink traditional education that’s still struggling to achieve widespread understanding and adoption.

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Bailey Hu

Bailey Hu is based in China’s hardware capital, Shenzhen. Her interests include local maker culture, grassroots innovation and how tech shapes society, as well as vice versa.