Popular third-party travel apps including Ctrip and Tuniu have restructured their formats to make purchases more transparent, as the companies work to comply with China’s new E-commerce Law, reports Chinese News Service.

The law, enacted Jan. 1, is an attempt to “maintain market order” and includes a slew of new protections for consumers. But it doesn’t just prohibit fake products and reviews on shopping sites like Taobao. The new law’s effects are now being felt by online customers booking train tickets ahead of the world’s largest annual human migration, the Chinese New Year travel rush.

The process of buying train tickets had formerly included certain add-on features by default, requiring thrifty buyers to de-select unwanted additions before booking.

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Bailey Hu

Bailey Hu is based in China’s hardware capital, Shenzhen. Her interests include local maker culture, grassroots innovation and how tech shapes society, as well as vice versa.