The quantified self-movement now extends to tracking even your pelvic floor muscles.  In 1948 Dr. Arnold Kegel invented the famous Kegel exercise, which is essentially repeatedly contracting and relaxing the pelvic floor muscles (PFMs or colloquially Kegel muscles) to make them healthy. These muscles s are important not just for a happier bedtime but also other health benefits, like providing stability to the bladder to prevent urinary incontinence.

But Kegel can get tedious. Combining self-tracking and gamification, the Skea fitbit and app hope to help. Just as Skea shouts out in its recently started Kickstarter campaign: “Imagine playing Temple Run with Fibit. Not with fingers, but with pelvic floor muscles!”

There long exists a variety of pelvic toning devices such as electric stimulationrubber resistance balls. Skea isn’t the first training app for pelvic floor muscles, though. By the time of Skea’s Kickstarter debut, San Francisco-based Kegal trainer KGoal has raised almost $200k on Kickstarter since it launched this June. However, gaming is the crux of Skea from the beginning while KGoal is currently working on incorporating gaming into its design.

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Rita Liao

Telling the uncommon China stories through tech. I can be reached at ritacyliao [at] gmail [dot] com.