On-demand delivery and in-home service apps saw massive adoption in China in 2015. Similar to the group-buying craze of 2014, the hype has been backed by venture money. Following several rounds of marketing wars, fuelled by massive subsidies, it’s not surprising to see consolidation in the market, especially in the wake of the Chinese stock market plunge.

One of the better outcomes of the market squeeze has been the pockets of business model innovation that have cropped up among on-demand services. While the nature of on-demand services already lends itself to a basic model of digital disruption, a handful of Chinese services are seeking to diversify in an increasingly competitive market. Here we’ve gathered a few case studies across logistics, mobile fintech and beauty supplies:

On-demand beauty services app Helijia requires freelance beauticians on its platform to purchase beauty products directly from the company behind the app. The company claims their products are direct imports, which implies a higher profit margin. At the same time Helijia makes product quality a selling point.

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Tracey Xiang

Tracey Xiang is Beijing, China-based tech writer. Reach her at traceyxiang@gmail.com