Uber is packing this year with charity campaigns aimed at winning over China’s white collar workers.

“In our more established cities, we plan on doing charity campaigns pretty much every month,” says Zhiyuan Meng, a marketing manager at Uber. Incorporating charity into its campaigns is partly an appeal to Uber’s existing user base, which is mostly white collar, says Mr. Meng. If a campaign is too commercial, it will be “challenged.”

In particular, the company will focus its campaigns on the app’s carpooling feature, or People’s Uber, which was launched last August in Beijing. Carpooling can be considered a kind of “charity” or non-profit activity, and campaigns around carpooling are more likely to be approved by Uber management, says Mr. Meng.

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Eva Xiao

Eva Xiao is a tech reporter based in Shanghai. Contact her at eva.xiao@technode.com or evawxiao (wechat & twitter).