2016 has been a golden year for both business-oriented and media entertainment-oriented live streamers in China. The streaming industry was worth some RMB 10 to 15 billion RMB (US$ 1.45-2.18 billion) in 2015, according to an estimate by China International Capital Corporation. Some predicted that the market will expand up to RMB 60 million by 2020.

The streaming hype was so intense that the government quickly stepped in to ensure that platforms are compliant with relevant regulations. In early November 2016, China’s Cyberspace Administration of China (CAC) released new policies requiring content providers to obtain qualifications. The administrative body also set rules on monitoring user data.

Content varies from entertainment-oriented content like singing, talent shows, reality shows, and eSports to business-oriented content which sell products. E-commerce platforms such as Taobao and JD.com have both launched their own live-streaming platforms to sell products. Moreover, Momo, a location-based social networking app, has seen a significant growth after incorporating one-to-one communications live streaming function.

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Junse Lee

Junse lives in the future. She is interested in new rules and ethics technology will bring into people's lives.