While China marked the 90th anniversary of People’s Liberation Army (PLA) in late July with a military parade, the country’s netizens are celebrating the event in their own way by flooding the top social media platforms with PLA uniform portraits. Scanning a QR code and uploading a headshot photo, then a composite self-portrait is ready for you to attract tens of “likes” from friends. The trick went viral quickly with page views for the program spiking to 800 million in two days.

The incident has brought the technology behind the program—HTML5—back to the spotlight. Born to high expectations, the technology has run into headwinds due to performance and compatibility issues. But with the development of technology and changing market conditions, it is ready to record a real boom, according to Wen Xiangdong, VP of Egret Technology.

Several market shifts have shed brighter prospects on the technology. At the end of last year, Facebook rolled out Instant Games, a new HTML5-enabled cross-platform gaming experience, on Messenger and Facebook News Feed. On top of that, Adobe announced plans to cease support for Flash by the end of 2020, giving opportunities for more modern open web standards like HTML5 to fill in the gap.

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Emma Lee

Emma Lee is Shanghai-based tech writer, covering startups and tech happenings in China and Asia in general. We are looking for stories related to tech and China. Reach her at lixin@technode.com.