China has grand schemes for its technological development. In addition to the country’s AI plan, which the country hopes will make it a world leader in artificial intelligence by 2030, the “Made in China 2025” initiative highlights the nation’s development roadmap for next few years.

The program, which has drawn Donald Trump’s ire, aims to shift China’s economy to high tech industries, including robotics and chipmaking. But as the country moves towards more advanced manufacturing, it is thrust into a fierce contest of nations, one which developed countries are used to winning.

China began to ponder its over-reliance on foreign technology in 2013 when Edward Snowden exposed the clandestine relationship between the National Security Agency and American tech companies. Five years later, in 2018, this reliance was again called to attention after ZTE was temporarily sanctioned from sourcing components from American manufactures for violating a US export ban.

Start your free trial now.

Get instant access to all our premium content, archives, newsletters, and online community.

Monthly Membership

Yearly Membership

What you get

Full access to all premium content and our full archives

Members'-only newsletters

Preferential access and discounts to all TechNode events

Direct access to the TechNode newsroom

Start your free trial now.

Get instant access to all our premium content, archives, newsletters, and online community.

Monthly Membership

Yearly Membership

Chris Udemans

Christopher Udemans is a Shanghai-based data and graphics reporter. He covers Chinese artificial intelligence, mobility, and cybersecurity. You can contact him at chrisudemans [at] technode [dot] com.